The Invisible JavaScript Backdoor

Music Transcription with Transformers

Concurrency in Julia

Issue #122

11/10/2021

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Thanks for everyone who wrote in with recommendations for fitness wearables. Also if you want to connect on LinkedIn, feel free to send me an invite and say hi! I enjoy connecting and chatting with subscribers. For me personally the web has facilitated some much needed socializing since the start of COVID. Crazy to think that was already pretty much 2 years ago (I was living in China at that time). In that same vein, we have a Discord server which occasionally hosts some conversations. Anyway, here's the issue.

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The Invisible JavaScript Backdoor

Published: 9 November 2021
Tags: javascript, infosec


JavaScript is notorious for its lack of security, but I've never seen something like this before. In this concise article, Wolfgang Ettlinger demonstrates how an "invisible Unicode character hidden in JavaScript source code" can create a very difficult to spot backdoor in a simple express server.


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Music Transcription with Transformers

Published: 9 November 2021
Tags: machine learning


There are a couple of different machine learning models that "[extract] symbolic representations of music from raw audio". One drawback is that they're all fairly specific to an instrument. In this article, the authors (too many to list, but can be seen at the top of the article) "highlight some of [their] recent advances toward more general music transcription systems". The article itself isn't super heavy, but it links to a couple of more detailed research papers.


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Concurrency in Julia

Published: 9 November 2021
Tags: julia


Julia is a dynamically typed language with a focus on performance (not a usual combination). We've seen it used for developing a game in a previous issue, but this article by Lee Phillips focuses on its support for concurrency. Specifically, Lee dives into multithreading, distributed processing, and asynchronous multithreading.


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