Rudra: Finding Memory Safety Bugs in Rust at the Ecosystem Scale

How X Window Managers Work, And How To Write One (Part I)

Consolidating the user model

Issue #118

11/3/2021

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Rudra: Finding Memory Safety Bugs in Rust at the Ecosystem Scale

Published: 31 October 2021
Tags: rust


Rustaceans pride themselves on the memory safety of Rust. Many a times I've heard them say, "Rust just won't allow you to make mistakes". That might be the case most of the time, but sometimes you have to go into unsafe mode, which suspends some of the stringent memory rules. In this informative article, Micah Lerner covers a paper that outlines "Rudra, a system for finding memory safety bugs in code written with the Rust programming language". Micah briefly describes Rust's memory management system, then dives into the design, implementation, and evaluation of Rudra.


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How X Window Managers Work, And How To Write One (Part I)

Published: 10 April 2014
Tags: linux, cpp


If you're familiar with Linux, you're definitely familiar with X window managers. Do you know how the windowing system on your machine works though? Chuan Ji has written a three part series on the subject (title kind of gives it away). Although this series of articles is from 2014, the concepts of the first article still hold up. The implementations in the second article might have some updates, but overall it's still quality content on an essential part of your bread maker (in this case I mean your computer, the thing that earns you money, however it could be an essential part of your actual bread maker!).


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Consolidating the user model

Published: 2 November 2021
Tags: java


Project Valhalla is an experimental OpenJDK project led by Brian Goetz, with the aim of adapting the Java language and runtime to modern hardware. Now that the "primitive classes have taken shape" Brian Goetz has written an article-esque email where he once again explores one of the main objectives of Valhalla, "providing user-programmable classes which could be flat and dense in memory".


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